Begin your search through our materials in the general categories below, or explore more specific topics on the right hand side of this page!

Catalog

We are now open for the 2017-2018 academic year!  Please call or visit during our back-to-school hours-

Tuesday & Wednesday, August 15-16  2 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Tuesday & Wednesday, August 22-23  2 p.m.- 5 p.m.

Tuesday & Wednesday, August 29-30  2 p.m.- 5 p.m.

We will reopen for normal operating hours on Tuesday, September 5.  

 

Take The Field Museum with you!

 

From a skunk specimen to SUE’s tooth to a ceremonial mask from Cameroon, the N. W. Harris Learning Collection at The Field Museum gives educators and parents a chance to take the Museum's collection to their classroom or home.  Borrow these specimens,  artifacts, and related curricular materials for up to one month, and when you return your borrowed treasures, peruse the over 100-year-old Learning Collection to take something new.

 

With over 400 unique exhibit cases (mini-dioramas) and 60 experience boxes (hands-on kits), your options are endless! 

 

Materials from the N. W. Harris Learning Collection at The Field Museum provide a unique and exciting way to engage students in scientific practices, develop critical thinking skills, and pique curiosity about Earth’s natural and cultural diversity. 

 

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  1. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

    Check out the damage one small bird can do to a large tree. The aptly named Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker uses it bill to drill into trees to get at the sap inside, and leaves many trees dead or distorted in its wake. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Caspian Tern

    Find this bird all over the world, identified by his large size and great red bill. The Caspian Tern's streaked forehead is usually spotted on large lakes, coastal waters, beaches and bays. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  3. Common Tern

    Investigate the physical characteristics that set this bird apart from the gulls it is often mistaken for. The Common Tern is relatively small, feeding mostly on small fish, which it captures in swift drops into the water, often completely submerging itself. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  4. Northern Waterthrush

    You'll have to be lucky to encounter the sweet song of this shy bird in the wild. The Northern Waterthrush likes to nest close to the water, and is found most commonly in the damp woods and along the banks of streams in the eastern United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  5. Wood Thrush

    Study the complicated nest of this large, handsome bird. The Wood Thrush prefers shady woodland where their loud liquid notes may be heard, especially in the morning and evening. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  6. Eastern Towhee

    Discover the extraordinary sounds that emanate from this bird. The towhee's familiar "chewink" note earned it its name. Its even more peculiar mating song is well-known to bird watchers. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  7. Red-eyed Vireo

    Study the magnificent markings of this common summer resident of Illinois. The conspicuous white line over its red eye gave this melodious bird its appropriate name: the Red-Eyed Vireo. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. Blackburnian Warbler

    Examine the unusual colorations that have earned this bird the nickname Fire Throat. The Blackburnian Warbler, usually smaller than a sparrow, has black and white feathers with hot orange stripes on his head and throat. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  9. Cedar Waxwing

    Listen in on the conversations of the Cedar Waxwing, found in flocks of up to 50. A common summer resident of Illinois, this bird communicates with a "lisping" sound that can be heard for several hundreds of yards. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  10. American Woodcock

    Take a walk on the beach and you might find the remnants of this bird's nightly hunting activities. The Woodcock uses its long bill to probe sandy ground for earthworms and other small insects, leaving holes called borings. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More

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