Grid List

Set Descending Direction

8 Item(s)

  1. Prairie Life

    A prairie is a unique ecological system that supports diverse plants and animals that depend upon each other for survival. Take a nature walk around your school to predict what plants' root systems look like underground and compare them with the prairie plant specimens in this box. Examine prairie mammals and birds up close to connect their physical characteristics with the prairie ecosystem. A few items in some of these boxes are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this box without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  2. Animal Habitats: Pond

    Animals live where they can find resources to meet their needs for food, water, shelter, and reproduction. These places are called habitats. Animals that share the same habitat often interact with and depend on other plant and animal species in the habitat. Use the contents of this box to make connections between animals and a pond habitat through dramatic play with pond puppets and contrast real specimens of dragonflies, beaver pelts, bluegills, and turtle shells. Learn More
  3. Animal Habitats: Oak Tree

    As many as 500 different kinds of animals may live in a single oak tree! Oak trees provide leaves, flowers, fruits, wood and seeds used by many organisms for food and shelter. Using puppets, act out the interactions of these organisms as they mill about their oak tree habitat. Create scientific illustrations of acorn specimens and learn about the life cycle of the oak tree. Learn More
  4. Rainforests

    Explore the rainforest ecosystem by examining all of its parts. Smell spices that were once of higher value than gold, investigate the relationship between a bird's beak and the types of food it eats, and examine how the leaves in the rainforest have evolved to efficiently shed water from their surfaces. Then, collect your own leaf samples and hold a competition to see which local leaves shed water the best. Learn More
  5. Antarctic Wildlife

    Antarctica is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent on earth. Only cold-adapted organisms survive there, and different species depend on each other for survival. Examine a king penguin skull, egg, and down feathers; an orca tooth; squid; and krill to see some of these incredible adaptations up close. Test out the power of fat insulation for keeping critters warm, and create a food web to show how Antarctic organisms provide one another with energy! Learn More
  6. Sea Life

    The objects in this box are wonderful for exploring sea animals' adaptations for living underwater. Use these objects to teach the concept that an animal's body form connects with several specific and necessary functions for its survival. Examine specimens of sea stars, sponges, shells, mussels, and crabs. Learn More
  7. Animal Homes

    Most animals, including humans, need shelter. Many animals create shelter with homes they build; others find sheltered places in their environment. By looking at the homes of the bark beetle, honeybee, mud dauber wasp, paper wasp, weevil, and robin, you can learn more about the importance of homes and the relationship of animals to their environments. Spanish language activity book and object cards are available upon request. Learn More
  8. Indiana Dunes

    Discover the windy conditions necessary to create and maintain the famous Indiana Dunes. Reaching heights of up to 200 feet, the dunes at Illinois Beach State Park are home to a variety of unusual plants and animals. Learn More

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

8 Item(s)