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  1. Red Fox (Playful Cub)

    Look at this prairie-dwelling red fox cub! As a member of the dog family, he eats small rodents and rabbits, and is known for his craftiness. Learn More
  2. Ermine

    See how this most common weasel of the northern United States takes a ferocious turn when preying on mice, rats and sometimes even large rabbits and birds. Learn More
  3. Mink (Teeth Bared)

    Learn about the aquatic nature of these excellent swimmers, who hunt for food on both land and water. Learn More
  4. Common Raccoon (Standing)

    Get an up close look at the agile hands of this raccoon and imagine him making the transition from wooded area to urban area. Learn More
  5. Prairie Life

    A prairie is a unique ecological system that supports diverse plants and animals that depend upon each other for survival. Take a nature walk around your school to predict what plants' root systems look like underground and compare them with the prairie plant specimens in this box. Examine prairie mammals and birds up close to connect their physical characteristics with the prairie ecosystem. A few items in some of these boxes are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this box without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  6. Deer Mouse (1)

    Follow the tracks of this tiny rodent into the forest, where she munches on seeds, grains, grasses and berries. Learn More
  7. Taxidermy (American Red Squirrel - Spring)

    Learn about squirrel in its forest habitat while exploring what's real and what's not! Borrow this case before visiting the Museum's dioramas to understand the process of taxidermy. Learn More
  8. Wild in Chicago

    Many animals make their home in Chicago's urban environment. Some of these animals are natives, while others are new to the region and flourish here. Become a field guide writer, observing and researching many species of animals found in urban Chicago. Discuss how students could take action to make their schoolyard or backyard a better place for animals. Then, take action! Spanish language activity book and object cards are available upon request. Attention: Some of the items in this box are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this box without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  9. Virginia Opossum (4)

    Examine the functional body structure of this marsupial, whose long tail and pouch are used to carry young and materials used to build nests. Learn More
  10. Cats and Dogs

    Cats and dogs share some common traits in skeletal structure, skull morphology, structural adaptations, and behavior. Compare and contrast the skeletal structures of canines and felines by studying real skulls, track casts, and images of fully articulated skeletons. Categorize skulls based on their morphology (structure) and explain your rationale for placing them into those categories. Learn to identify track casts of different canine and feline species. Learn More

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