Grid List

Set Ascending Direction

1-10 of 553

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  1. Cedar Waxwing

    Listen in on the conversations of the Cedar Waxwing, found in flocks of up to 50. A common summer resident of Illinois, this bird communicates with a "lisping" sound that can be heard for several hundreds of yards. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Blackburnian Warbler

    Examine the unusual colorations that have earned this bird the nickname Fire Throat. The Blackburnian Warbler, usually smaller than a sparrow, has black and white feathers with hot orange stripes on his head and throat. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  3. Red-eyed Vireo

    Study the magnificent markings of this common summer resident of Illinois. The conspicuous white line over its red eye gave this melodious bird its appropriate name: the Red-Eyed Vireo. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  4. Eastern Towhee

    Discover the extraordinary sounds that emanate from this bird. The towhee's familiar "chewink" note earned it its name. Its even more peculiar mating song is well-known to bird watchers. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  5. Wood Thrush

    Study the complicated nest of this large, handsome bird. The Wood Thrush prefers shady woodland where their loud liquid notes may be heard, especially in the morning and evening. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  6. Northern Waterthrush

    You'll have to be lucky to encounter the sweet song of this shy bird in the wild. The Northern Waterthrush likes to nest close to the water, and is found most commonly in the damp woods and along the banks of streams in the eastern United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  7. Common Tern

    Investigate the physical characteristics that set this bird apart from the gulls it is often mistaken for. The Common Tern is relatively small, feeding mostly on small fish, which it captures in swift drops into the water, often completely submerging itself. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. American Woodcock

    Take a walk on the beach and you might find the remnants of this bird's nightly hunting activities. The Woodcock uses its long bill to probe sandy ground for earthworms and other small insects, leaving holes called borings. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  9. Woodpeckers

    Examine the capable bodies of these abundant Midwestern birds. Six common species of Woodpecker are shown here, highlighting the foot structure, stiff feathers, chisel-like beak and barbed tongue that allow these birds to be so versatile. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  10. Hairy Woodpecker

    Marvel at the extraordinary characteristics of this woodpecker, whose toe structure, strong claws and sturdy tail maintain its upright position on precarious tree trunks, and whose long barbed tongue helps capture insects found within. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More

Grid List

Set Ascending Direction

1-10 of 553

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5