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  1. Little Brown Bat

    Hunker down with a family of brown bats and learn about their important roles as pollinators and seed distributors. Learn More
  2. Long-tailed Duck (2)

    This is the duck found most abundantly in the Chicago region. On Lake Michigan he dives in deep waters to find his food. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  3. Black-bellied Plover (1)

    Take a stroll through the sandy habitats of these shore birds, often found in spring and autumn along the beaches of Lake Michigan. The Black-Bellied Plover's diet consists of insects washed up by the waves. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  4. Ice Age Mammals

    This box contains models of mammals (and their teeth!) that could be found in the Chicago region 12,000 years ago. Look at the animals' physical characteristics and infer their evolutionary advantages. Discuss some of the physical changes that happened as Amebelodons evolved into mammoths and modern elephants. Debate what caused these changes and identify relationships among these animals based on their teeth. Learn More
  5. Wild in Chicago

    Many animals make their home in Chicago's urban environment. Some of these animals are natives, while others are new to the region and flourish here. Become a field guide writer, observing and researching many species of animals found in urban Chicago. Discuss how students could take action to make their schoolyard or backyard a better place for animals. Then, take action! Spanish language activity book and object cards are available upon request. Attention: Some of the items in this box are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this box without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  6. American Beaver

    This animal's webbed feet and broad, flat tail are well-suited for quick locomotion through the water and for being able to cleverly construct its dam. Here, the beaver is gnawing on a tree trunk, perhaps to prepare for repairing its home or simply for an evening snack. NOTE: This is a large case: 50 inches long, 18 inches wide, 37 inches high. Learn More
  7. Common Loon

    Connect the unique paddling foot structure of this water bird to those of the great diving birds of the dinosaur age. The strange call of the Common Loon is perhaps more recognizable than the bird itself. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. Blue-winged Teal (With Chicks)

    Scan the surface of Lake Michigan, and you may find one of these small ducks feeding with others of its flock. The Blue-winged Teal is a common summer resident of Illinois and is identifiable by the blue streak found on the front edge of her wings. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  9. From Quillwork to Beadwork: Native American Design

    Examine decorative and embellished objects made by Native Americans from around the East Coast and Midwest. Learn about the history of embellishments in different Native American cultures, and try creating your own beaded and "porcupine quill" patterns. Think about museum preservation of traditional objects, and decide if you would sell a family heirloom to be displayed in a museum. Learn More
  10. Canada Anemone

    Trek through the dunes around Lake Michigan and you will find this common summer flower. See how the Canada Anemones actually grow sepals instead of petals in this exhibit case featuring the flower growing in tall grass against a green backdrop. Learn More

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