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  1. Feather Changes of Starling

    Explore the extraordinary changes this bird undergoes between summer and winter. A resident of Eurasia and North Africa, the Starling uses light coloration in the summer and dark coloration in the winter to best adapt to his surroundings. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Swallows and Martins

    Behold the largest swallow found in North America. You will also notice that the Martin is the only swallow with a dark belly. This bird is a dark bluish-grey in color, and is a master of quick direction changes in flight. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  3. Rough-winged Swallow

    Examine the vibrant colors that this bird possesses. The Rough-Winged Swallow, widespread in the Northern Hemisphere, has a breast of rich brown and a white throat. It is usually spotted over fields, marshes, streams and lakes. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  4. Cliff Swallow

    Scan the face of a cliff and you are bound to spot the gourd-shaped nests of these social birds. Found in colonies of up to 150 pairs, the Cliff Swallow aids farmers by munching destructive insects like the alfalfa weevil and chinch bug. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  5. Chimney Swift

    Investigate the characteristics of this blackish, Swallow-like bird. The Chimney Swift is named such for his habit of nesting and roosting in chimneys. You can spot these birds in the open skies above urban areas, from Southern Canada all the way to Peru. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  6. Juvenile Bald Eagle

    Not available for selected dates
    Witness the majestic beauty of our national bird. The Bald Eagle is one of the largest birds of prey in North America, and can have a wingspan of up to eight feet. NOTE: This is a large case. Top section: 34 inches long, 34 inches wide, 35 inches high. Bottom base: 34 inches long, 34 inches wide, 32 inches high. (Does not fit through standard doorways.) ATTENTION: This specimen is temporarily unavailable. Learn More
  7. Tom Turkey

    The Eastern wild turkey also known as "Tom Turkey" is the most common in the entire eastern half of the U.S. They like open areas for feeding, mating and habitat. The Eastern wild turkey uses forested areas as cover from predators and for roosting in trees at night. A varied habitat of both open and covered area is essential for its survival. Wild turkeys have excellent vision during the day but do not see as well at night. They are also very mobile. Turkeys can run at speeds up to 25 mph, and they can fly up to 55 mph. NOTE: This is a LARGE case: 38 1/4 inches long, 23 inches wide, 37 3/8 inches high. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. Beef Byproducts

    The business of meat packing involves not only meat preserving, but creating useful byproducts from other parts of the cow. Learn how slaughtered cattle are used to produce pharmaceuticals, insulin, tiles, buttons, thyroid, casings, soap, tallow, combs, and more. Learn More
  9. Burrowing Crawfish

    Tunnel into the muddy riverbanks that form the homes of these lobster-like animals. The Burrowing Crawfish (or Crayfish) is common to the lowland rivers of Illinois. Learn More
  10. Large-mouthed Black Bass

    As you observe this bottom-dweller, you will see where the Black Bass gets its name, from its large mouth and dark color. Weighing about six pounds, this freshwater sunfish makes a good game fish. Learn More

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