Begin your search through our materials in the general categories below, or explore more specific topics on the right hand side of this page!

Catalog

We will remain closed for the 2020- 2021 academic year. 

If you currently have any Learning Collection materials in your possession, please hold onto those materials until further notice.  We will continue to monitor this situation closely and let you know as soon as possible when we are able to reopen to receive your materials.

Please do not purchase any new membership packages at this time.  

 

From a skunk specimen to SUE’s tooth to a ceremonial mask from Cameroon, the N. W. Harris Learning Collection at The Field Museum gives educators and parents a chance to take the Museum's collection to their classroom or home.  Borrow these specimens,  artifacts, and related curricular materials for up to one month, and when you return your borrowed treasures, peruse the over 100-year-old Learning Collection to take something new.

 

With over 400 unique exhibit cases (mini-dioramas) and 60 experience boxes (hands-on kits), your options are endless! 

 

Materials from the N. W. Harris Learning Collection at The Field Museum provide a unique and exciting way to engage students in scientific practices, develop critical thinking skills, and pique curiosity about Earth’s natural and cultural diversity. 

 

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

11-20 of 576

  1. Woodpeckers

    Examine the capable bodies of these abundant Midwestern birds. Six common species of Woodpecker are shown here, highlighting the foot structure, stiff feathers, chisel-like beak and barbed tongue that allow these birds to be so versatile. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Hairy Woodpecker

    Marvel at the extraordinary characteristics of this woodpecker, whose toe structure, strong claws and sturdy tail maintain its upright position on precarious tree trunks, and whose long barbed tongue helps capture insects found within. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  3. Red-bellied Woodpecker (1)

    Follow this bird's unusual winter migratory path, in search of adequate food rather than warmer climes. The Red-Bellied Woodpecker munches on a variety of seeds and fruit, becoming the orange farmer's enemy in orange season and best friend when insects abound. ATTENTION: This bird is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this item without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  4. Marsh Wren

    Stay out of the way of these compulsive birds, who take the practice of nest-building to a whole new level. The Marsh Wren continues to build her globular nests as long as she has young at home. As such, not one in twenty nests found actually contains eggs. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  5. Red-bellied Woodpecker (2)

    Follow this bird's unusual winter migratory path, in search of adequate food rather than warmer climes. The Red-bellied Woodpecker munches on a variety of seeds and fruit, becoming the orange farmer's enemy in orange season and best friend when insects abound. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  6. Winter Wren

    Discover the grounded nature of these woodland-dwelling birds, whose grayish-brown plumage keeps them well hidden. Rarely leaving the forest floor, the Winter Wren has a short tail and large feet. Learn More
  7. Yellowlegs

    Contemplate the size differences in these two water birds, close relatives with few other differential characteristics. The Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs spend their time on the riverbanks of the Midwest before heading to South America for the winter. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. Green-winged Teal

    Float around with a flock of Green-Winged Teals, common in Illinois only during migration. These ducks feed freely on seeds, grasses, insects, and other vegetable matter. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  9. Tanager and Cowbird

    Discover the crafty, parasitic methods this bird uses to feed and raise its young. The Cowbird, usually seen on the backs of or at the feet of pasture cattle, lays her eggs in the nest of a smaller bird who dutifully raises it as her own. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  10. Wilson's Snipe

    Walk a mile in the open marsh home of this common bird, and you'll find he puts his long beak to good use. The Wilson's Snipe, like other members of his family, probes the muddy ground with his bill to capture its meals. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

11-20 of 576