Begin your search through our materials in the general categories below, or explore more specific topics on the right hand side of this page!

Catalog

We will remain closed for the 2020- 2021 academic year. 

If you currently have any Learning Collection materials in your possession, please hold onto those materials until further notice.  We will continue to monitor this situation closely and let you know as soon as possible when we are able to reopen to receive your materials.

Please do not purchase any new membership packages at this time.  

 

From a skunk specimen to SUE’s tooth to a ceremonial mask from Cameroon, the N. W. Harris Learning Collection at The Field Museum gives educators and parents a chance to take the Museum's collection to their classroom or home.  Borrow these specimens,  artifacts, and related curricular materials for up to one month, and when you return your borrowed treasures, peruse the over 100-year-old Learning Collection to take something new.

 

With over 400 unique exhibit cases (mini-dioramas) and 60 experience boxes (hands-on kits), your options are endless! 

 

Materials from the N. W. Harris Learning Collection at The Field Museum provide a unique and exciting way to engage students in scientific practices, develop critical thinking skills, and pique curiosity about Earth’s natural and cultural diversity. 

 

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  1. Sparrows

    Discover the territorial and rather haphazard methods the male sparrows use in nesting season. Sparrows breed mostly in the months from March through August, remaining loosely monogamous. Sixteen different sparrow specimens are shown here, demonstrating Chicago's most abundant types. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Field Sparrow

    Investigate the characteristics that make the Field Sparrow different than others of its family. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  3. Fox Sparrow

    Investigate the fox-like colorations of this bird. The Fox Sparrow can be found in wooded undergrowth from Alaska, to the southern United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  4. Henslow's Sparrow

    Explore the secretive ways of this short-tailed, flat-headed bird. Henslow's Sparrow, with his olive colored head and reddish brown wings, can be found in the weedy fields of the central and northeastern United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  5. Song Sparrow

    Find out why these birds pump their tails when they fly. The Song Sparrow, with his heavily streaked breast, is usually found in thickets and marshes throughout North America. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  6. Swamp Sparrow

    This bird's name gives you a good clue as to where they like to spend their time. The Swamp Sparrow, a darker shade of red compared to most other sparrows, resides in fresh marshes with tussocks, bushes or cattails around the United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  7. American Tree Sparrow

    You can identify this beautiful bird by the presence of a single dark spot on her breast and a solid red-brown cap. The American Tree Sparrow inhabits willow thickets, brushy roadsides, weedy edges and marshes from Alaska to the central United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. Vesper Swallow (1)

    Often confused with its relative the Song Sparrow, this bird can be distinguished from others by the white ring around his eye. The Vesper Sparrow is often found in the meadows, fields, and prairies of Canada and the central United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  9. Vesper Sparrow (2)

    Often confused with its relative the Song Sparrow, this bird can be distinguished from others by the white ring around his eye. The Vesper Sparrow is often found in the meadows, fields, and prairies of Canada and the central United States. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  10. European Starling

    Journey across the Atlantic to catch this dynamic bird in action. The Starling, who inhabits Eurasia and North Africa, takes on a yellow bill and an iridescent color in the summer, and then becomes heavily speckled with a dark bill in winter. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More

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