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  1. Wild in Chicago

    Many animals make their home in Chicago's urban environment. Some of these animals are natives, while others are new to the region and flourish here. Become a field guide writer, observing and researching many species of animals found in urban Chicago. Discuss how students could take action to make their schoolyard or backyard a better place for animals. Then, take action! Spanish language activity book and object cards are available upon request. Attention: Some of the items in this box are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this box without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  2. Six-Lined Lizard (1)

    Check out the simple characteristics that make this desert-dwelling reptile easily identifiable. Featuring six bright yellow stripes on its back, the Six-Lined Lizard is harmless, munching only on insects. Learn More
  3. Garter Snake (4)

    Don't shy away from this beneficial snake, the most abundant to be found in the Chicago area. The Garter snake lives anywhere from city gardens to country marshes, and can be identified by the three light stripes on its back. Learn More
  4. Common Box Turtle

    Follow this land-dwelling turtle through the thin forests and grassy fields of the eastern United States. The Common Box Turtle feeds on the berries, slugs and insect larvae of its woodland home. Learn More
  5. Blue Racer Snake

    You can only find this snake west of the Mississippi River. But don't be fooled by the name, Blue Racers can range from plain bluish, greenish blue, gray, to brownish, sometimes with yellow bellies. Long and slender, these snakes feed on small mammals, frogs, lizards, and insects. Learn More
  6. Indiana Dunes

    Discover the windy conditions necessary to create and maintain the famous Indiana Dunes. Reaching heights of up to 200 feet, the dunes at Illinois Beach State Park are home to a variety of unusual plants and animals. Learn More
  7. Garter Snake (2)

    Don't shy away from this beneficial snake, the most abundant to be found in the Chicago area. The Garter snake lives anywhere from city gardens to country marshes, and can be identified by the three light stripes on its back. Learn More
  8. Common Hog-Nosed Snake (2)

    Don't be frightened of this snake, whose sudden movements, thick body and broad head may seem threatening. The Common Hog-Nosed Snake is actually harmless, and keeps to itself in its preferred habitat of dry, sandy places. Learn More
  9. Fox Snake

    Don't be fooled by the threatening pose of this non-venomous snake. Found mostly in the north central United States, the Fox Snake's best defense is a pungent odor that he releases when disturbed. Learn More
  10. A Good Egg

    Animal embryos develop in eggs, which provide development, nourishment and protection. The egg structures of different species differ in unique ways that ensure the survival of their embryos. Examine the eggs of snakes, birds, frogs, and other animals up close to learn about their differences and how the habitats in which they are laid relate to their form and care. Spanish language activity book and object cards are available upon request. Attention: Some of the items in this box are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this box without a permit, please contact us. Learn More

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