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  1. Short-eared Owl

    You will change your ideas about the hunting methods of owls when you encounter this bird, whose vision is unaffected by daylight. The Short-Eared Owl can almost always be found in the country around Chicago, hunting at all hours. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Crab Apple

    The Crab Apple, which grows throughout the Chicago region, blossoms during May and June and is an ideal fruit to be made into jelly. Colored in delicate tints, and emitting a delectable fragrance, the Crab Apple is a pleasant presence to be around. Learn More
  3. Seventeen-Year Cicada

    As you observe this exhibit case, think about how the Cicada spends its seventeen years on Earth, a lifespan that far exceeds that of any other insect. Spending the majority of their life as larvae, hidden underground, the Cicada only emerges as a flying insect at the very end of its life. Learn More
  4. Burrowing Crawfish

    Tunnel into the muddy riverbanks that form the homes of these lobster-like animals. The Burrowing Crawfish (or Crayfish) is common to the lowland rivers of Illinois. Learn More
  5. American Redstart (With Chicks)

    Check out the brilliant coloration of this abundant member of the Warbler family. The Redstart summers in Illinois, and is best known for the way it fans out its tail in flight. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  6. Common Box Turtle

    Follow this land-dwelling turtle through the thin forests and grassy fields of the eastern United States. The Common Box Turtle feeds on the berries, slugs and insect larvae of its woodland home. Learn More
  7. Yellow Lady's Slipper (Deer Management)

    Prance into the world of the deer, one of our most frequent connections to the natural world. Urban expansion has created the need, however, for drastic measures to keep the numbers of these abundant animals in check. Witness a few of the ways we protect our land when deer run rampant. Learn More
  8. Eastern Bluebird

    Catch a glimpse of a pair of bluebirds who are quickly becoming more rare in Illinois. Find out why scientists believe these birds return to the same nesting location year after year. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  9. Least Bittern (1)

    Wade into the marshy home of this, the smallest bittern found in Illinois, who flies only in short spurts when frightened. ATTENTION: This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  10. Stilt Sandpiper (1)

    Discover the amazing hunting feats of this bird, who submerges its entire neck and head in the mud in search of the worms, snails, and vegetable matter it feeds on. The Stilt Sandpiper can be found in Chicago only in autumn, where it wades freely through shallow pools. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More

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