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  1. European Starling

    Journey across the Atlantic to catch this dynamic bird in action. The Starling, who inhabits Eurasia and North Africa, takes on a yellow bill and an iridescent color in the summer, and then becomes heavily speckled with a dark bill in winter. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Northern Bobwhite (1)

    Listen closely to see if you can hear the well-known mating call of this grass-dwelling bobwhite. Flight is a last resort for these birds with camouflaged plumage. Learn More
  3. Northern Shoveler (1)

    Discover the practical uses of this duck's bill, ideally suited for freshwater surface feeding. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  4. Built for Flight

    Birds can fly farther and faster than any other type of animal: their bodies are designed for it. Touch a bird's wing, compare the weight of bird and mammal bones, and investigate a bird's skeletal structure to understand how most birds are built for flight. Attention: Some of the items in this box are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this box without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  5. Killdeer (Farm Background)

    Consider the falcon like characteristics of this common summer resident of Illinois, a member of the Plover family. Often found in pastures and cultivated fields, a pair of Killdeers are shown here with their nest. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  6. Acadian Flycatcher

    Watch the speed and agility with which these small birds catch flying insects. Colored with olive green plumage above and with a yellow tinge on the sides and belly, the Acadian Flycatcher can be found most often in eastern North America. ATTENTION: This bird is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and may only be borrowed by educational institutions that are open to the general public and are non-profit (such as a public or charter school), but may not be borrowed by private individuals or institutions without a special permit. If you have any questions about whether you or your institution qualify to borrow this item without a permit, please contact us. Learn More
  7. American Redstart (With Chicks)

    Check out the brilliant coloration of this abundant member of the Warbler family. The Redstart summers in Illinois, and is best known for the way it fans out its tail in flight. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. American Osprey

    Marvel at these water birds, whose well-adapted feet and toes make snatching fish from the water a breeze. The American Osprey inhabits the greater portion of the United States and Central America. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  9. Downy Woodpecker (With Newly Hatched Chicks)

    You'll find this year-round native wandering around Illinois even in deepest winter. The Downy Woodpecker, relatively fearless, will continue pursuing its insect prey even when observers are a few feet away. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  10. House Wren (With Chicks)

    Known for their habits of becoming attached to a particular home, the House Wren is a welcome guest. Found in pairs, these birds croon a charming song and help out around the house by destroying a variety of insect pests. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More

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