Grid List

Set Descending Direction

1-10 of 25

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  1. Long-tailed Duck (1)

    This is the duck found most abundantly in the Chicago region. On Lake Michigan he dives in deep waters to find his food. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Common Loon (With Eggs)

    Connect the unique paddling foot structure of this water bird to those of the great diving birds of the dinosaur age. The strange call of the Common Loon is perhaps more recognizable than the bird itself. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  3. Fox Snake

    Don't be fooled by the threatening pose of this non-venomous snake. Found mostly in the north central United States, the Fox Snake's best defense is a pungent odor that he releases when disturbed. Learn More
  4. Blue Racer Snake

    You can only find this snake west of the Mississippi River. But don't be fooled by the name, Blue Racers can range from plain bluish, greenish blue, gray, to brownish, sometimes with yellow bellies. Long and slender, these snakes feed on small mammals, frogs, lizards, and insects. Learn More
  5. Gray Fox

    Witness the agility of this member of the family Canidae, commonly found throughout the Midwest. Gray foxes can climb trees, often preying on squirrels in addition to other small mammals, insects, fruits, and birds and their eggs. Learn More
  6. Common Goldeneye (2)

    Take in the breathtaking scenery of this duck's chilly winter habitat. A common winter resident of Lake Michigan, the Common Goldeneye catches most of its food below water's surface. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  7. Blue-winged Teal (With Chicks)

    Scan the surface of Lake Michigan, and you may find one of these small ducks feeding with others of its flock. The Blue-winged Teal is a common summer resident of Illinois and is identifiable by the blue streak found on the front edge of her wings. These birds are subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remain under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  8. Snapping Turtle

    Wonder why this turtle snaps? As the largest of the shell-bearing reptiles, the Snapping Turtle cannot draw its head into its shell when threatened, necessitating the use of its powerful jaws. Learn More
  9. Shell Buttons

    Learn why the rivers of the Midwest produce the best buttons in the world, made from Mussel shells. Check out the step-by-step process of producing a shell button, something businesses along the Mississippi have been doing since 1891. Learn More
  10. Little Brown Bat

    Hunker down with a family of brown bats and learn about their important roles as pollinators and seed distributors. Learn More

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

1-10 of 25

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3