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  1. Black-bellied Plover (2)

    Take a stroll through the sandy habitats of these shore birds, often found in spring and autumn along the beaches of Lake Michigan. The Black-Bellied Plover's diet consists of insects washed up by the waves. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  2. Green Snake

    Study the docility of this domestic snake, one of the few who is able to live within the limits of a large city like Chicago. The Green Snake feeds exclusively on crickets, earthworms, and caterpillars.

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  3. Chicago-Area Salamanders

    Did you know you can find salamanders right here in Chicago? Here are seven local specimens of these amphibians, and learn about their habitat, diet, and distinguishable characteristics. Learn More
  4. Ice Age Mammals

    This box contains models of mammals (and their teeth!) that could be found in the Chicago region 12,000 years ago. Look at the animals' physical characteristics and infer their evolutionary advantages. Discuss some of the physical changes that happened as Amebelodons evolved into mammoths and modern elephants. Debate what caused these changes and identify relationships among these animals based on their teeth. Learn More
  5. American Beaver

    This animal's webbed feet and broad, flat tail are well-suited for quick locomotion through the water and for being able to cleverly construct its dam. Here, the beaver is gnawing on a tree trunk, perhaps to prepare for repairing its home or simply for an evening snack. NOTE: This is a large case: 50 inches long, 18 inches wide, 37 inches high. Learn More
  6. Common Loon

    Connect the unique paddling foot structure of this water bird to those of the great diving birds of the dinosaur age. The strange call of the Common Loon is perhaps more recognizable than the bird itself. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More
  7. Spotted Turtle

    Check out the sluggish streams and bogs where this turtle makes her home. The Spotted Turtle buries her large eggs in the ground in the late spring or early summer. Learn More
  8. Common Water Snake

    A snake has a backbone with about 200 bones in it. This allows the snake to move flexibly like a chain. Observe this snake resting, coiled in its watery home. Learn More
  9. Flying Squirrel

    Glide into the fascinating world of the Midwestern flying squirrel. Numerous poses display what is rarely seen of this nocturnal animal. Learn More
  10. Common Goldeneye (1)

    Take in the breathtaking scenery of this duck's chilly winter habitat. A common winter resident of Lake Michigan, the Common Goldeneye catches most of its food below water's surface. This bird is subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and remains under the stewardship of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It can be borrowed for wildlife conservation, ecology, biology, scientific, or educational purposes. There may be limits on other, non-educational uses. Please contact us if you have any questions. Learn More

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