Grid List

Set Descending Direction

1-10 of 31

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  1. Edible Gilled Mushrooms

    Take a look in your backyard for some of these common edible gilled mushrooms! All of these mushrooms bear spores on their gills and are part of the class Agaricomycetes. They have caps that look like umbrellas. Specimens include the conic wax cap, the chanterelle, the white pin wheel, the common meadow, and the shaggy mane mushrooms. Learn More
  2. Rainforests

    Explore the rainforest ecosystem by examining all of its parts. Smell spices that were once of higher value than gold, investigate the relationship between a bird's beak and the types of food it eats, and examine how the leaves in the rainforest have evolved to efficiently shed water from their surfaces. Then, collect your own leaf samples and hold a competition to see which local leaves shed water the best. Learn More
  3. Flax

    Pull up a stalk of flax and learn about its great many uses. Flax seeds are used in linseed oil, while the fibers, or linen, can produce yarn, paper and other things. Learn More
  4. Pyralin

    It takes a lot to convert cotton bolls into usable cotton fabric. Investigate the step by step process that mixes this cellulose product, that forms the basis of the cotton fabric, with shredded and treated cotton, eventually producing manufactured pyroxylin. Learn More
  5. Tea Plant

    Tea comes from the young leaves of a tea plant, a shrub cultivated in India, China, Japan, and other countries. Take a look at a sprig from this beautiful shrub, and see the many colors and textures of the various types of tea it is used to make. Learn about the process that can turn one plant into so many products! Learn More
  6. Lotus

    This beautiful wildflower is protected by law in Illinois. Learn how Native Americans used this plant as a valuable food resource. Marvel at its protective way of distributing its seeds in the water. Learn More
  7. Saprotrophic Fungi

    Did you know that mushrooms belong to the fungal kingdom, which also includes mildews, molds, rusts, and yeasts? Lacking a true root system, as well as chlorophyll, fungi are usually detrivores and among the only organisms which can decompose wood. A number of specimens are shown here, including the gemmed puffball, morel, field or horse mushroom, bracket fungi, sulphur polypore and both the cup and pear-shaped puffball. Learn More
  8. Coconut

    Stranded on a desert island? You can count on the coconut to provide food, drink, shelter, and fuel, among other things. A native of the Malayan coast, the versatile coconut tree can reach heights of up to 100 feet. Learn More
  9. Linoleum

    One person's waste is another's product! The waste from the manufacture of corkstoppers and other cork byproducts is used in the making of linoleum. Learn the process of how the material used to make your bulletin board is transformed into material used for your kitchen floor! Learn More
  10. Sugar Maple Tree

    Discover the beautiful sugar maple tree, found in the northeastern United States. Not only does the processed sap of the tree produce three quarters of the maple sugar crop, but the lumber is used in making fine floors and furniture. Learn More

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

1-10 of 31

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4